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Any of you guys have any experience with this?       #: 1433
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 Posted: Fri Nov 30th, 2018 09:02 am
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https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HroR-FYhCx0

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x8tnHIMNqTo

I have maybe 100+ stumps to pull that average maybe 4-8 inches in diam, some bigger, some smaller. I dont know if the chain/rope is fixed at the top of the beam, I dont have any experience with this sort of thing, I think that it would have to be fixed.

Not sure how its fixed although Im sure I could come up with something.

Not sure how height of the tool versus height of the stump play with one another for optimal pull leverage.

Im hoping to answer these questions.

Ideally Id like to find something online that shows a clear picture of the tool so that I can follow the details but cant seem to find a name for it.

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 Posted: Fri Nov 30th, 2018 02:44 pm
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Thats awesome! Looks like they just built a strong triangle from some timber and routed the strap over the top... simple enough

If you have 100 of them to do this would be a good way to do it! Or you can rent a backhoe or something stronger then a truck hitch?



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 Posted: Fri Nov 30th, 2018 09:23 pm
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The principle is simple, it is a basic triangle to change the angle the force is applied. With a hitch the force would be close to at a right angle to what you need, the perfect direction being straight up. I have pulled small stumps with an engine hoist doing the same thing. The limitation is the root ball. You need to have the bottom of the triangle far enough away so that it is not on top of the root ball, otherwise you are literally pulling against yourself. The other VERY important thing is how the chain is attached. If it can slide or slip it can easily hurt someone or your truck. It is best to have a second observer watch while another drives the pull vehicle.

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 Posted: Fri Nov 30th, 2018 11:08 pm
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We always used a large tractor rim stood up with the chain routed over it to pull up t-posts, fence posts, clothes-line posts, small stumps, etc..

It's really basic geometry.

Here's the basic concept: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHC-AA1xj4w

Obviously, the larger the rim, the more upward force you're applying, which is what you want.



GB :)

Last edited on Fri Nov 30th, 2018 11:18 pm by Bird76Mojo

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 Posted: Sat Dec 1st, 2018 03:38 am
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Wow! Great timing for this topic. Brand new chainsaw!!!
I'm getting ready to clear the corners of my property. Lilacs, laurels, and a apple tree. I've been wondering how I can reduce the hard labor portion of removing the stumps. I have a mountain of compost I want to get rid of by fill the holes left over. I grew up on an orchard but it was converted to a housing development. Lol.



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 Posted: Sat Dec 1st, 2018 04:04 am
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Bird76Mojo wrote:
We always used a large tractor rim stood up with the chain routed over it to pull up t-posts, fence posts, clothes-line posts, small stumps, etc..

It's really basic geometry.

Here's the basic concept: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eHC-AA1xj4w

Obviously, the larger the rim, the more upward force you're applying, which is what you want.



GB :)

Well the size of the rim doesn't change the amount of force.  In this one the tire was on top of the root system, so they were fighting themselves or it would have come out easier.

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 Posted: Sat Dec 1st, 2018 04:20 am
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The rim has to be very close to the stump to gain "leverage" and yes, the size of the rim does matter. A smaller rim doesn't allow as much upward force to be applied to the stump.

Rim height from the ground does matter as it converts more of your horizontal pulling force to upward leverage the higher you go from the ground.

Putting the rim closer to the stump does fight you a little if you're on top of a major root, but it has to be as close as possible to convert more of your horizontal pulling force to vertical force..


I've been doing this for more than three decades. Often with 100-125hp tractors, so I believe I know what I"m doing.



GB :)

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 Posted: Sat Dec 1st, 2018 05:08 am
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What's a safe length from stump to hitch? Do you use a chain and a tow strap? I'm worried about it hitting the observer and the truck if the chain or strap gives. Seems like itd be best to combine the chain and strap. Using the strap on the tree stump. I see guys on shows like Ax Men and Gold Rush constantly breakin chains and snapping cables and I'm amazed no one gets decapitated or cut in half.



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 Posted: Sat Dec 1st, 2018 05:51 am
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We always use a chain that's much larger/heavier than necessary. One that you know isn't going to break for the task at hand. I personally wouldn't use a cable unless it was a VERY heavy one. Something meant for a dozer. lol I'm extremely weary of cables. A cable choker would be very handy on stumps though.

We never worried about the length as far as safety due to having overly heavy chains, but I think our heavy tractor chain is around 30ft +/- long and is 3/4" grade #100 chain rated around 36,000lbs and being grade 100 is guaranteed for 2.5 times the working load limit. It's an old quarry chain spec'd for lifting. We usually use a 3/8" though, due to it being easier to lift, carry, and for ease of sliding under logs, etc.

With larger chains, you're almost guaranteed to break a drawbar or hitch before you snap a chain, but it never hurts to visually inspect all of the links. We've destroyed several rims over the years pulling things that were too large. Just be aware that any chain, cable, or strap could break or come loose at any time and do major damage or kill someone. Have everyone stand well clear of the operating area, and have the money to replace windows, damaged equipment, etc.

I've contemplated getting my federal explosives license just for removing stumps. Much less labor and the license doesn't cost much, but the record keeping and storage requirements are just too involved to deal with these days.



GB :)

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 Posted: Sat Dec 1st, 2018 11:08 am
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Bird76Mojo wrote:
We always use a chain that's much larger/heavier than necessary. One that you know isn't going to break for the task at hand. I personally wouldn't use a cable unless it was a VERY heavy one. Something meant for a dozer. lol I'm extremely weary of cables. A cable choker would be very handy on stumps though.

We never worried about the length as far as safety due to having overly heavy chains, but I think our heavy tractor chain is around 30ft +/- long and is 3/4" grade #100 chain rated around 36,000lbs and being grade 100 is guaranteed for 2.5 times the working load limit. It's an old quarry chain spec'd for lifting. We usually use a 3/8" though, due to it being easier to lift, carry, and for ease of sliding under logs, etc.

With larger chains, you're almost guaranteed to break a drawbar or hitch before you snap a chain, but it never hurts to visually inspect all of the links. We've destroyed several rims over the years pulling things that were too large. Just be aware that any chain, cable, or strap could break or come loose at any time and do major damage or kill someone. Have everyone stand well clear of the operating area, and have the money to replace windows, damaged equipment, etc.

I've contemplated getting my federal explosives license just for removing stumps. Much less labor and the license doesn't cost much, but the record keeping and storage requirements are just too involved to deal with these days.



GB :)

Here what I built yesterday for the job, took 40 minutes with the chain saw, might work, might not, I'll find out today.

Wish I could film it but I am alone.

I'll update with pictures

Attachment: IMG_20181130_140024.jpg (Downloaded 49 times)

Last edited on Sat Dec 1st, 2018 11:08 am by 1930

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 Posted: Sat Dec 1st, 2018 12:52 pm
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Never personally used anything like that but yours looks impressive. BTW I see in the pic what looks like a NJ license plate on the bumper on the floor of the barn, do you live in NJ?.



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 Posted: Sat Dec 1st, 2018 01:00 pm
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Thanks, no, I'm a body man, just someone bumper. I live in fl

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 Posted: Mon Dec 3rd, 2018 12:51 pm
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I had a go this weekend, I was able to pull 7 small stumps ( all under 5 inches ) within less than 2 hrs time, some required digging a little behind the root ball.

My biggest obstacle was traction, I couldn't get any in the sand.

Summary is that I am back on the idea of getting a mini excavator and hopefully learning how to use it well enough in a short period of time so that I can justify it's cost.

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 Posted: Mon Dec 3rd, 2018 02:53 pm
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FYI mini excavators are more expensive then the large ones, even to rent!!

Always hang a heavy blanket or coat over the chain/cable/strap so if something does give it will fall to the ground instead of kill somebody.
Never stand anywhere near the chain/cable/strap under tension, never pull at angles more then 15 degrees and use some common sense = safe!!

Love the rim idea!! I have some stumps around here to pull, the one Im working on now is about 4' around and it sits right where I built my new carport. It was a large cedar tree.. so far we have cut it down as much as possible with chainsaws and now we are using fire to burn it down to acceptable level.......



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 Posted: Mon Dec 3rd, 2018 03:49 pm
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410customs wrote:
FYI mini excavators are more expensive then the large ones, even to rent!!

Always hang a heavy blanket or coat over the chain/cable/strap so if something does give it will fall to the ground instead of kill somebody.
Never stand anywhere near the chain/cable/strap under tension, never pull at angles more then 15 degrees and use some common sense = safe!!

Love the rim idea!! I have some stumps around here to pull, the one Im working on now is about 4' around and it sits right where I built my new carport. It was a large cedar tree.. so far we have cut it down as much as possible with chainsaws and now we are using fire to burn it down to acceptable level.......

I've found here in FL that there is a size limit on equipment that I am able to rent

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 Posted: Mon Dec 3rd, 2018 05:26 pm
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If I were to rent a piece of equipment for that job, I'd probably go with the largest stump grinder I could find. Prep the property by cutting all of the stumps as short as possible with your chainsaw first, to save time on your rental and maximize your dollar's worth.

I built a stump burner for my father out of an old heating oil tank. It works well but it does require a lot of wood to keep it burning, and the stumps need to be somewhat dry for it to work very well. For large stumps, it helps to remove the burner and clean the ashes off of the stump periodically. He's wanted one for ages, so he was really excited when I threw this one together 100% from scrap steel. He's a farmer, and very frugal, so of course he LOVES free stuff. It's crude, but effective. We've used it in places where pulling stumps could turn out bad for us. Around underground utilities, near the house, etc.

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 Posted: Tue Dec 4th, 2018 03:39 am
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Stump burner!!! That's a great idea. 

At first i was like what? Why dont you just pile up the stumps and burn them. You dont need a special stove to burn stumps. That's just silly. 

Then I looked at the pics and read the " it takes a lot of wood to keep it burning " part and realized you were putting the stove over the stump and burning. 

That's slick!! You've obviously been dealing with stumps for a while to come up with that. That's so cool!! Thank you for sharing. I would have never thought of something like that. Happy holidays

Last edited on Tue Dec 4th, 2018 03:39 am by Eddie Money



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 Posted: Tue Dec 4th, 2018 04:00 am
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I'm considering converting it over to burn waste oil now. To avoid loading it with wood so often. Some sort of drip system with a couple gallon tank above so it's gravity fed. Lots of people heat their sheds/garages this way.

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 Posted: Tue Dec 4th, 2018 04:44 pm
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Yes they do! I will be building a drio waste oil heater for my shop as we are 100% off grid here. Its wood heat now.
The only issue I have with a gravity fed drip system is the fact that many gallons of flammable fluid is stored above the flame = no beuno
So you have to be really careful building and using one of the gravity fed/drip style

Stump burning is an art form :) Many people will just drill holes in the stump, fill the holes with diesel or other flammable mixture and start burning. You can see lots of techniques on Youtube for this
We just cut our stump down as far as possible, helps to have a crappy "dirt" chain saw you don't care about as much, then build a fire on top of the stump. Grab your favorite book and burn that sucker down!



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 Posted: Wed Dec 5th, 2018 01:14 am
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Yeah, we usually cut a large/deep cross or X in the stump with the chainsaw first. It let's coals fall down into it which seems to help quite a bit to get it burning internally, but once it clogs with ash, you no longer get a good effect from it sometimes. I get lucky once in a while to where the roots will burn down around 2 to 3ft into the ground (at around a 45 degree or whatever angle they're at) and you can stick wire down the hole to verify it. Pretty cool when that happens but it's not often it does. They're usually too green, or choke themselves out, or get completely covered in ash which puts them out.

I imagine cutting the cross into the stump would really help a bunch if using an oil burning stump burner. Direct that drip right at the middle of the X to keep that center burning as hot as possible.



GB :)

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