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Ford-Rangers.com Ranger Forum > Ranger Engine Tech > 4 Cylinder Gasoline > Why does a/c cycle more when accelerating vs. stopped?

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Why does a/c cycle more when accelerating vs. stopped?       #: 1210
 Moderated by: Mike69, MaDMaXX
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 Posted: Fri Aug 31st, 2018 07:50 am
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wh23g3g
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On my 98 Ranger I knew the a/c clutch was worn being the original with 385,000 miles. It still worked but it was cycling a lot but seemed to only been when accelerating and on a 2.5 automatic that really kills it. So I had it in the shop for some work I couldn't do and had the mechanic install the new a/c clutch I had. He saved the old one and it was pretty worn out and uneven. However, it still cycles a lot while accelerating versus stopped idling. I use to have a chip, cat-back exhaust, aftermarket air intake, spacer on it to squeeze out every bit of power I could get with bolt ons so it didn't seem as bad when I had all that on. It wasn't even to try and be fast it was just to make it easier to keep up with traffic. I've now returned the Ranger to all stock Ford stuff so I guess all that extra stuff really made a difference because it wasn't cycling that bad when I had the a/c on back then. A few years ago it was cycling a lot so I changed the cycling switch to a Motorcraft piece, but it turned out there was some other problem causing the accumulator to freeze. So I evacuated, flushed everything in the a/c system out, replaced the accumulator, orifice tube, all o-rings, and added new oil. That's about 2-3 years now. It still works great, gets down to 38-40 out the vents. Coldest a/c out of any vehicle I've ever been in. It seems to cycle at the worst times while driving up a hill or accelerating to get on the freeway. Just doesn't seem like it's right. What would cause the a/c compressor to cycle more frequently while accelerating versus just stopped idling or is that normal?



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 Posted: Fri Aug 31st, 2018 09:53 am
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JAMMAN

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Well I can tell you it isn't the clutch.

The AC will cycle off for 3 reasons only.

Wide open throttle condition. I haven't had a problem but some have reported the wide open throttle being misrepresented. I myself haven't done enough research to know if this is tied in to the throttle position sensor or some combination of vacuum switches coordinating with TPS someone please clear this up.

The other 2 are under pressure or over pressure WHICH can be caused by many parts of the system. That many miles it would be hard to tell which parts are failing it could be the compressor itself or the orifice tube being clogged.

I hate to send you to another board but there is a TRS tech article that really breaks this down nicely and I even use it for reference:

http://www.therangerstation.com/tech_library/Resurrecting_Your_Ford_Ranger_Air_Conditioning.shtml



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 Posted: Fri Aug 31st, 2018 02:27 pm
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sheltonfilms
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I see this in Forscan switching on and off about every 3 seconds at highway speeds (hard to hear the clutch so using the scanner works better).

You usually see this when the load is light. Cab is already cooled down (temp diff between evap core and incoming air is lowest). This allows the pressure to build faster and compound that with higher RPMs it hits the pressure threshold quicker.

Won't see this as bad at idle and you won't see it as much when the cab is still relatively hot (first startup after sitting in the hot sun).

Newer cars have variable displacement compressors so they never really cycle because at low load they adjust the compressor plate angle, essentially lowering the capacity of the compressor. Only time they ever cut out is if the evap temp sensor indicates the coil is about to freeze.



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 Posted: Sat Sep 1st, 2018 12:21 am
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wh23g3g
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Since changing the clutch, the cycling isn't as severe. I checked the air gap on the old clutch and it was way out. The clutch plate was pretty worn out. It probably wouldn't hurt to change out the compressor but it gets down to 40 on MAX/AC, sometimes going into the 30s out the center vents. I'll live with it until something starts leaking since it hasn't been too long since I serviced it. Maybe when it hits 400,000 miles I'll change all the a/c parts out.



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